Check out our Facebook album, “2012 Labor Management Conference,” to see photos from the event.

Chalkboard is honored to have been invited by U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan to present at the second Labor Management Conference this week in Cincinnati. Teachers, administrators and a school board member are part of our team showcasing the CLASS Project.

The conference kicked-off with seven people signing a document, including top leaders of the National Education Association, the American Federation of Teachers, the American Association of School Administrators, the Council of Chief State School Officers, the National School Boards Association, the Council of the Great City Schools, and the U.S. Department of Education. In other words, all the major players in public education.

The document is titled, Transforming the Teaching Profession. It identifies the core elements of a transformed profession that will achieve high levels of student achievement, increased equity, and increased global competitiveness.

Here are some excerpts:

• In a professional culture, teachers and principals together make the primary decisions…with student learning at the center of all such decisions.

• Attracting a high-performing and diverse pool of talented individuals to become teachers and principals is a critical priority…whether they enter the profession through traditional or alternative pathways.

• We must support programs that prepare highly effective educators and offer high quality and substantive curricula and clinical preparation experiences.

• Effective teachers and principals are career-long learners. Effective schools and districts are learning communities where teachers and principals individually and collaboratively continuously reflect on and improve their practice. Such communities of practice thrive when there is structured time for collaborative work informed by a rich array of data and access to internal and external expertise.

• Good evaluation systems should provide feedback to educators from both colleagues and supervisors that is meaningful, credible, and actionable, and should use evidence-based processes that are fair, accurate, and transparent.

• We need to offer educators career pathways that provide opportunities for increasingly responsible roles.

• These roles must be coupled with compensation that is high enough to attract and retain a highly skilled workforce; reflects the effectiveness, expertise, and contributions of each educator; and is consistent with societal regard accorded to comparable professions.

Reading this document, and seeing the nation’s top education leaders commit their agencies and organizations to it, inspires me to continue on with our work at Chalkboard.

On one front, we are working with schools of education and other education stakeholders to enhance teacher preparation programs. On another front, our CLASS project is structured around expanded career paths, meaningful performance evaluations, targeted and relevant professional development, and new compensation models. And, it requires the support of school boards, district leadership and local union representation, with teachers at the forefront of developing and implementing plans to support and strengthen teaching and raise student achievement. CLASS embodies the core elements of the Transforming the Teaching Profession document.

I’m inspired, also, to see Oregon’s education leaders at this national conference focused on quality teaching, including Superintendent of Public Instruction Susan Castillo and top leaders of OEA, COSA and OSBA. With all the key education stakeholders at the table, we surely can “transform the teaching profession.”

 

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11 Responses to “2012 Labor Management Conference”

  1. kona says:

    It would be great to sit down at the table with the unions (NEA, AFT) at a labor management conference and ask them directly why it is acceptable for unions to employ/condoning bullying tactics in labor negotiations. It is two faced to denounce it in the classroom and then use the tactics in their real life experiences. Where is the education community when this is taking place? Nothing but silence.

  2. kona says:

    Note:

    Where are the comments about the bullying tactics from those in the education community? No one really cares, it seems.

    “The board approved the contract reluctantly, 6-1, with several members citing what they characterized as strong-arm tactics by the Reynolds Education Association.”

    “I was surprised and dismayed by the tactics of the REA,” said board member Joe Teeny, who voted against the contract. “They were bent on striking to get what they wanted, and they were willing to just about anything to get it.”"

    http://www.oregonlive.com/gresham/index.ssf/2012/05/reynolds_school_board_union_ap.html

  3. Steve Buel says:

    Kona, you were fed a line. The rotten tactics were pretty much deployed by the school board out there, not the union. I have several friends in Reynolds who teach there and am pretty well-informed about what went on.

  4. kona says:

    Steve, key sentence …. “I have several friends in Reynolds who teach there and am pretty well-informed about what went on”.

    I have first hand experience on what happens during teacher strikes. Teachers act like 1950s steel workers peering into windows, yelling their favorite “scab” comments, blocking driveways provoking drivers, picketing school board member homes,etc.

    There is too much video on YouTube showing these antics to give credibility to your teaching friends.

    But, I am willing to listen exactly what your teaching friends said were the “rotten tactics” employed by the school board. I would really like to know their side of the “rotten tactics”. Were they blocking driveways, harassing drivers, picketing homes, etc., or what?

  5. Steve Buel says:

    Kona, I don’t condone pounding on people’s cars while they are being blocked. Nice job of handling it by the driver. But your post suggested it was one sided. Was there another exit? Who was the driver? Lots missing here. But this is nothing compared to the school board championing the issue of firing people with anonymous complaints. This guy was held up for maybe a minute. Getting fired with no due process is horrendously worse. The key part of my sentence was they were \friends\. Very dependable ones who would give me an accurate accounting of stuff I believe. Both had rotten things done to them, teachers, by Bruce McClain, school board member. Now, I know how wrong this can be since I served as a school board member myself. I witnessed one thing myself and called him on it. He didn’t deny it.

  6. kona says:

    It really doesn’t matter who the person was, but he was a classified employee who was trying to get to work. He was a fellow employee with these people. I’m surprised that you would say there was “lots missing here”. It seemed fairly straight forward about the bullying tactics.

    1) “But this is nothing compared to the school board championing the issue of firing people with anonymous complaints”.

    I have no idea what that means. Was someone fired?

    2) “Getting fired with no due process”, was someone fired?

    3) “Both (teachers) had rotten things done to them, teachers, by Bruce McClain, school board member.” What was the “rotten thing” done to them?

    So you are suggesting that bullying tactics by the unions are are OK? Or, that bullying tactics are justified if the other side uses them?

  7. kona says:

    Correction, a fellow employee who was leaving work from the school. My understanding was that they had all exits blocked.

  8. kona says:

    Here is another one. How great would it be if we would allow students to act this way whenever they didn’t get their way?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mmaV3q47Mww&feature=relmfu

  9. Steve Buel says:

    I was merely commenting on the one-sided argument you presented when the most bullying was done easily by the school board. I was carefully following the strike and had a good idea of the issues that is why I was not bashing teachers, but criticizing the board. The firing of teachers using anonymous complaints was in the contract put forth by the school board. Let’s see, didn’t our ancestors fight a war beginning in 1776 partly for due process of law? This was a huge, huge issue. There were lots of others that made a lot of sense from a teacher or student or parent standpoint. But this is enough to show who was bullying who.

  10. kona says:

    To go full circle, this was my original comment.

    “It would be great to sit down at the table with the unions (NEA, AFT) at a labor management conference and ask them directly why it is acceptable for unions to employ/condone bullying tactics in labor negotiations. It is two faced to denounce it in the classroom and then use the tactics in their real life experiences. Where is the education community when this is taking place? Nothing but silence.”

    The primary question is, “Why it is acceptable for unions to employ/condone bullying tactics in labor negotiations”.

    I think there is a difference between negotiating points of a contract proposal and overt, public acts of bullying. I done think bullying tactics are acceptable by any educational institution. Are you in agreement?

    You said, “The firing of teachers using anonymous complaints was in the contract put forth by the school board.” Do you have the exact language of that comment, or are you relying on hearsay? That would not ever hold up legally so I am skeptical of the validity of the comment.

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